E-ISSN 2688-9641 | ISSN 2688-9633
 

 

GENERAL - OVERVIEW

  • Journal of Orthopedic Clinical Specialties is an open access, peer reviewed journal that focuses on all aspects of musculoskeletal research throughout the orthopedic healthcare profession.  Review articles are highly appreciated
  • All articles published by Journal of Orthopedic Clinical Specialties are made freely and permanently accessible online. All articles to Journal of Orthopedic Clinical Specialties are posted online immediately as they are ready for publication. All articles will be assigned a DOI number (Digital Object Identifier) whereby they become searchable and citable without delay.
  • The journal aims for a first decision to be made within 6-8 weeks of receipt of the submission and the Editors-in-Chief make the final decision on publication.
  • Online submission of manuscript: http://www.ejmanager.com/my/jocs  
  • Journal of Orthopedic Clinical Specialties uses double-blind review, which means that both the reviewer and author identities are concealed from the reviewers, and vice versa, throughout the review process. Before being sent to reviewers, manuscripts are pre-screened by the editorial office to check that they agree with the criteria for publishing in Journal of Orthopedic Clinical Specialties: accordance with the aims and scope of the journal, nature of the study, originality of the results, quantity and quality of data, general conclusions, and presentation of the work with a exceptional quality of English language. If the paper does not fulfill these criteria, it may be rejected at this stage without review.
  • Please read the instructions below carefully for details on the submission of manuscripts, the journal's requirements and standards as well as information concerning the procedure after a manuscript has been accepted for publication in Journal of Orthopedic Clinical Specialties.

 

PUBLICATION ETHICS AND RESPONSIBILITIES

The relevant duties of the Journal of Orthopedic Clinical Specialties pursuant to expectations of authors, reviewers, and editors are set forth below.

Responsibilities of authors

By submitting a manuscript to Journal of Orthopedic Clinical Specialties, the author(s) warrant that the manuscript is their own, original work and that it has neither been published previously nor is currently being considered for publication elsewhere. They also warrant that the sources of any ideas and/or words in the manuscript that are not their own have been properly attributed through appropriate citations and/or quotes. An author should not normally publish manuscripts describing essentially the same research in multiple journals or publication venues. Such redundant publication is generally considered to constitute unethical publishing behavior, and if discovered may result in a manuscript under consideration being rejected, or a published article being retracted. Authors of manuscripts reporting on original research should present an accurate account of the work performed, accompanied by an objective discussion of its significance. Underlying data should be represented accurately in the manuscript. The manuscript should contain sufficient detail and references to permit others to replicate the work. The fabrication of results and the making of fraudulent or knowingly inaccurate statements constitute unethical behavior and may be cause for rejection or retraction of a manuscript or published article. Where the manuscript reports on commercial software, hardware, or other products, authors must include a declaration at the beginning of the manuscript in which they must either state that no conflict of interest exists or describe the nature of any potential conflict. All sources of financial support for the research should also be disclosed in the manuscript. The author(s) of a manuscript agree that if the manuscript is accepted for publication in Journal of Orthopedic Clinical Specialties, the published article will be copyrighted using a Creative Commons "Attribution-Non Commercial-Share Alike" license. This license allows the author(s) to retain the copyright, but also allows others to freely copy, distribute, and display the copyrighted work, and derivative works based upon it, under certain specified conditions. Authors are responsible for obtaining written permission to include any images or artwork for which they do not hold copyright in their articles, or to adapt any such images or artwork for inclusion in their articles. The copyright holder must be made explicitly aware that the image(s) or artwork will be made freely available online as part of the article under a Creative Commons "Attribution-Non Commercial-Share Alike" license. The authors' names should be listed on the article in order of their contribution to the article, and all authors take responsibility for their own contributions. Only those individuals who have made a substantive contribution should be listed as authors; those whose contributions are indirect or marginal (e.g., colleagues or supervisors who have reviewed drafts of the work or provided proofreading assistance, and heads of research institutes/centers/labs) should be named in an "Acknowledgments" section at the end of the article, immediately preceding the Reference List. The corresponding author must ensure that all appropriate co-authors and no inappropriate co-authors are included on the article, and that all listed co-authors have seen and approved the final version of the article and agreed to its publication. Where an author discovers a significant error or inaccuracy in an article of his/hers that has been published in Journal of Orthopedic Clinical Specialties, he/she has an obligation to promptly notify the editors and cooperate with them to correct the article or retract it as appropriate.

Responsibilities of reviewers

Journal of Orthopedic Clinical Specialties' reviewers perform work for the journal on a volunteer basis. Given that most of these individuals are in full-time employment, their reviewing activities for Journal of Orthopedic Clinical Specialties must, by necessity, not be their top priority. Reviewers are free to decline invitations to review particular manuscripts at their discretion, for example, if their current employment workload and/or other commitments make it prohibitive for them to complete a review in a timely fashion and to do justice to the task in the available time frame. They should also not accept manuscript review assignments for which they feel unqualified. Reviewers who have accepted manuscript assignments are normally expected to submit their reviews within three weeks (20 days). They should recuse themselves from the assignment if it becomes apparent to them at any stage that they do not possess the required expertise to perform the review, or that they may have a potential conflict of interest in performing the review (e.g., one resulting from competitive, collaborative, or other relationships or connections with any of the authors, institutions, or companies associated with the manuscript). Privileged information or ideas obtained by reviewers through the peer review process must be kept confidential and not used for personal advantage. Any manuscripts received for review must be treated as confidential documents, and must not be shown to or discussed with others except as authorized by Journal of Orthopedic Clinical Specialties Journal Editor. When conducting their reviews, reviewers are asked to do so as objectively as possible, refraining from engaging in personal criticism of the author(s). They are encouraged to express their views clearly, explaining and justifying all recommendations made. They should always attempt to provide detailed and constructive feedback to assist the author(s) in improving their work, even if the manuscript is, in their opinion, not publishable. Reviewers should identify in their reviews relevant published work that has not been cited by the author(s), together with any instances in which proper attribution of sources has not been provided. They should call to the responsible editor's attention any major resemblances between a manuscript under consideration and other published articles or papers of which they are aware, as well as any concerns they might have in relation to the ethical acceptability of the research reported in the manuscript.

Responsibilities of Editors

Journal of Orthopedic Clinical Specialties has ultimate responsibility for deciding if a manuscript submitted to Journal of Orthopedic Clinical Specialties should be published, and in doing so is guided by the journal's policies as determined by Journal of Orthopedic Clinical Specialties editorial board and constrained by such legal requirements as shall then be in force regarding libel, copyright infringement, and plagiarism. The Editor may consult with the Associate Editor and other members of the editorial team, as well as with reviewers, in making publication decisions. The editors will evaluate manuscripts for their intellectual content without regard to the race, color, gender, sexual orientation, religious beliefs, ethnic origin, citizenship, or political philosophy of the author(s). They will not disclose any information about a manuscript under consideration to anyone other than the author(s), reviewers and potential reviewers, and in some instances Journal of Orthopedic Clinical Specialties editorial board members, as appropriate.

Additionally, the editors will make every effort to ensure the integrity of the blind review process by not revealing the identity of the author(s) of a manuscript to the reviewers of that manuscript, and vice versa. When evaluating a manuscript for publication, in addition to considering standard criteria pertaining to the rigor of the manuscript, the quality of its presentation, and its contribution to humanity's stock of knowledge, the editors will also seek evidence that ethical harms have been minimized in the conduct of the reported research. They will question whether the benefits outweigh the harms in the particular study's case. Since the Journal of Orthopedic Clinical Specialties welcomes the submission of manuscripts from any country, it is necessary to recognize that laws and regulations regarding research ethics and ethical approval vary worldwide. As such, the editors may need to seek clarification in this regard with the author(s) and request that they supply a letter from the relevant institutional ethics committee or board that approved the research. The editors will be guided by COPE's Guidelines for Retracting Articles when considering retracting, issuing an expression of concern about, and issuing corrections pertaining to articles that have been published in Journal of Orthopedic Clinical Specialties.

ETHICAL GUIDELINES

Journal of Orthopedic Clinical Specialties adheres to the below ethical guidelines for publication and research.

Authorship

All the authors in a manuscript are responsible for the technical information communicated. For this reason it is necessary that all authors must read and approve the final version of the manuscript before signing the consent and declaration form. All named authors must have made an active contribution to the conception and design and/or analysis and interpretation of the data and/or the drafting of the paper and ALL must have critically reviewed its content and have approved the final version submitted for publication. Participation solely in the acquisition of funding or the collection of data does not justify authorship.

Journal of Orthopedic Clinical Specialties adheres to the definition of authorship set up by The International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE). According to the ICMJE authorship criteria should be based on 1) substantial contributions to conception and design of, or acquisition of data or analysis and interpretation of data, 2) drafting the article or revising it critically for important intellectual content and 3) final approval of the version to be published. Authors should meet conditions 1, 2 and 3.

It is a requirement that all authors have been accredited as appropriate upon submission of the manuscript. Contributors who do not qualify as authors should be mentioned under Acknowledgements.

Change in authorship: We do not allow any change in authorship after submission. We do not allow any addition, deletion or change in sequence of author name. We have this policy to prevent fraud.

Acknowledgements

Under Acknowledgements, please specify contributors to the article other than the authors accredited. Please also include specifications of the source of funding for the study and any potential conflict of interests if appropriate. Suppliers of materials should be named and their location (town, state/county, country) included.

Similarity index

JOCS will check the plagiarism with the use of iThenticate. To reduce the similarity, please give proper citations and use the words/sentences carefully.

Permissions

Reproduction of Copyrighted Material: Documentation of permission to reproduce previously copyrighted material in the JOCS is required from the copyright holder. This includes reproductions of text, figures, tables, and any other copyrighted materials.

Photographs: When possible, authors are encouraged to not include participants’ faces in photographs. A signed release is required from any individuals who are recognizable in any photographs or video files that are included in manuscripts and supplemental content that is submitted to the JOCS. 

Clinical CASE Reports: A signed release from each patient described in a clinical CASE report is required to provide permission for the JOCS to review and publish the manuscript. 

Preparation of Manuscript

Style and Formatting Guidelines

Blinding: The JOCS uses a double-blind review process. Authors and institutions should not be identified anywhere in the manuscript except on the title page. 

Page Formatting: Each page must be formatted for 8.5- by 11-inch paper, double spaced, with 1-inch margins and a font no smaller than 10 points. Begin numbering the pages of your manuscript with the abstract page as #1; then consecutively number all successive pages. Include line counts on each page to facilitate the review process. Do not right justify pages. 

The title page and acknowledgments as well as each table or figure must be uploaded as separate documents. None of these should be included as part of the primary manuscript file. 

Title Page: The title page must be uploaded as a separate document from the primary manuscript file. Titles should be brief within descriptive limits (a 16-word maximum is recommended). The title page should also include the name, title, affiliation, e-mail address, and Twitter handle (if applicable) of each author and the name, address, phone number, and email address of the author to whom correspondence is to be directed. No more than 4 credentials should be listed for each author. Protocol registration information for clinical trials, systematic reviews, and meta-analyses should be included at the bottom of the title page.

Primary Manuscript File: The primary manuscript file should contain the following, in the order listed, with each section beginning on a separate page:  a. Abstract, Key Words, and Key Points (first numbered page); b. Text (body of manuscript); c. References; d. Legends to figures.

Abstract: All manuscripts must include an abstract that serves as a summary. Type the article title (but not the authors’ names) at the top, skip 2 lines, and begin the abstract. Word limits and required headings differ by manuscript category and may be found in Manuscript Categories. 

Conclusions: The manuscript should not have a separate summary section—the abstract serves as a summary. It is appropriate, however, to consolidate the findings with a concise conclusions paragraph at the end of the “Discussion” section. Conclusions must be supported by the results of the current study.

Clinical Applications:  At the end of the manuscript there is a separate Clinical Applications section.  This section tells the practitioner how your data can be applied and used.

References: It is unethical to present others’ ideas as your own. References should be numbered consecutively, using superscripted Arabic numerals, in the order in which they are cited in the text. References should be cited liberally, but for certain manuscript categories (Original Research, Short Report, Technical Note), the number of cited references is limited, as described in Manuscript Categories. 

References to articles or books that have been published or accepted for publication are listed in numerical order at the end of the manuscript. Journal title abbreviations should conform to Index Medicus style. Examples of references are illustrated below. See the American Medical Association Manual of Style, 11th edition (New York, NY: Oxford University Press; 2020), for other examples. 

Journals: 

1. Rosene JM, Raksnis B, Silva B, et al.  Comparison of concussion rates between NCAA division I and division III men’s and women’s ice hockey players. Am J Sports Med. 2017;45(11):2622-2629.

2. Waninger KN, Goodbred A, Vanic K, et al.  Adequate performance of cardiopulmonary resuscitation techniques during simulated cardiac arrest over and under protective equipment in football.  Clin J Sports Med. 2014;24(4):280-283.

Books: 

1. Matthews TD, Kostelis KT. Designing and Conducting Research in Health and Human Performance. 2nd ed. New York, NY; 2020.

Personal communications are cited in the text as follows: ‘‘. . . (J.A. Smith, written communication, January 21, 2020).’’ The written or oral nature of the communication is stated, and the communication does not appear in the reference list. Authors must provide written permission from each personal communication source. 

Tables: Tables should be formatted as follows: (1) The title is bold, and body and column headings are Roman type; (2) units are set above rules in parentheses; (3) numbers are aligned in columns by decimal point; (4) footnotes are indicated by superscript letters; and (5) the first letter of each major word in titles is capitalized, but only the first word in each column or row entry is capitalized. 

Tables should be numbered sequentially as they are cited in the text.

Figures: Figures should use Arial, a white background, and no surrounding box. Minimum recommended resolution is 300 dots per inch. Multipart figures should be mounted together and Arial capital letter labels (A, B, C, etc) used.

Authors wishing color reproduction should request this in a cover letter with the submitted manuscript. Authors must pay for the additional cost of color reproduction ($100/figure) before their accepted article is typeset. 

Legends to figures are numbered with Arabic numerals in order of appearance in the text. 

Supplemental Content: Authors are encouraged to submit supplemental content that can be archived on the JOCS Web site should their manuscript be accepted for publication. Supplemental content may include detailed intervention or measurement protocols, video files of study procedures, additional figures or tables, datasets, computer code for data processing or analysis, or other materials that may be of interest to readers but do not fit concisely into the manuscript.

Active Voice: Writing should be in the active voice (for example, instead of ‘‘Participants were selected,’’ use ‘‘We selected participants’’) and in the first person (for example, instead of ‘‘The results of this study showed,’’ use ‘‘Our results showed’’). 

Units of Measurement: Units of measurement shall be recorded according to the International System of Units, as specified in the AMA Manual of Style, except for angular displacement, which should be measured in degrees rather than radians. Examples include mass in kilograms (kg), height in centimeters (cm), velocity in meters per second (m/s), angular velocity in degrees per second (o/s), force in Newtons (N), and complex rates (mL·kg−1·min−1). 

Reporting Percentages: Percentages should be accompanied by the numbers used to calculate them. Avoid reporting a single P value as an inequality (eg, P > .05) but instead report the exact value (eg, P = .12). If, however, the value would be reported as P < .00 because of the number of significant digits allowed, then it is acceptable to state P < .001. When reporting groups of P values, it is permissible to provide an inequality (eg, ‘‘groups were similar on all demographic characteristics [P values > .05]’’). 

Nonnative English-Speaking Authors: Submissions written in English are welcomed from all countries. Authors, particularly those whose first language is not English, may wish to have their English-language manuscripts edited by a native speaker before submission. This is optional but may help to ensure that the academic content of the paper is fully understood by the editors and reviewers. The JOCS does not endorse any specific professional editing provider. However, we provide the following links to several vendors that offer these services:

Editage: https://www.editage.com/ 

ELSS: http://www.elss.co.jp/en/services/editing.html 

Balbes Consultants: http://www.balbes.com/index.html 

Manuscript Categories

Quantitative Original Research; Qualitative Original Research; Systematic Review or Meta-Analysis; Clinical CASE Report; Literature Review; Communications Letter to the Editor

Quantitative Original Research

On a separate page, the manuscript must have an abstract with a limit of 300 words followed by 3 - 6 key words not used in the title. The abstract should have sentences (no headings) related to the purpose of the study, brief methods, results, conclusions and clinical applications, and should include a statement denoting the level of significance set for the study (i.e. ρ ≤ 0.05). • 3 to 6 key words; • Abstract word count; • Body of manuscript word count (not counting abstract, references, tables, or figures).

Body of Manuscript: The body of an Original Research manuscript contains the following sections: “Introduction,” “Methods,” “Results,” and “Discussion,” “Clinical Application.” Headings should appear at the start of each section. The “Introduction” should contain a brief overview of the problem being addressed, provide a justification for the study being performed, and clearly state the study purpose and research hypotheses. The “Methods” section should contain sufficient detail concerning the study design, participants, materials, procedures, and analysis used so that others can replicate the study. The “Results” should be summarized using descriptive and inferential statistics that are presented in the text and in figures or tables as appropriate. The “Discussion” section should summarize the primary findings of the study and put the original results into the scientific and clinical context of the existing research literature.  The “Clinical Applications” section tells the practitioner how your data can be applied and used.

Word and Reference Count: The body of a quantitative Original Research manuscript should have a maximum of 4000 words, and no more than 30 references should be cited. 

Resources: Authors should consult the following guidelines specific to certain study designs when writing their manuscripts: 

Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT), Studies of Diagnostic Accuracy (STARD), Strengthening the Reporting of Observational studies in Epidemiology (STROBE).

Qualitative Original Research

On a separate page, the manuscript must have an abstract with a limit of 300 words followed by 3 - 6 key words not used in the title. The abstract should have sentences (no headings) related to the context, objective, design, setting, patients or other participants, data collection and analysis, results, and conclusions, and clinical applications. • 3 to 6 key words; • Abstract word count; • Body of manuscript word count (not counting abstract, references, tables, or figures).

Key Words, Word Counts, and Key Points: Immediately after the abstract, these items should be provided:

Body of Manuscript: The body of an Original Research manuscript contains the following sections: “Introduction,” “Methods,” “Results,” and “Discussion.” The “Introduction” should supply a brief overview of the problem being addressed, provide a justification for the study performed, and clearly state the study purpose and research hypotheses. The “Methods” section should contain sufficient detail concerning the study design, participants, materials, procedures, and analysis used so that others can replicate the study. The “Results” should be described in the text and in tables or figures as appropriate. The “Discussion” section should summarize the primary findings of the study and put the original results into the scientific and clinical context of the existing research literature.  The “Clinical Applications” section tells the practitioner how your data can be applied and used.

Word Count: The body of a qualitative Original Research manuscript should have a maximum of 5000 words, and no more than 30 references should be cited.

Resources: Authors should consult the following guidelines specific to certain study designs when writing their manuscripts:

Standards for Reporting Qualitative Research (SRQR),

Consolidated Requirements for Qualitative Research (COREQ).

Systematic Review or Meta-Analysis

On a separate page, the manuscript must have an abstract with a limit of 300 words followed by 3 - 6 key words not used in the title. The abstract should have sentences (no headings) related to the objective, data sources, study selection, data extraction, data synthesis, conclusions, and clinical applications.  • 3 to 6 key words; • Abstract word count; • Body of manuscript word count (not counting abstract, references, tables, or figures).

Key Words, Word Counts, and Key Points: Immediately after the abstract, these items should be provided:

Body of Manuscript: The body of a Systematic Review or Meta-Analysis manuscript contains the following sections: “Introduction,” “Methods,” “Results,” “Discussion.” The “Introduction” should supply a brief overview of the problem being addressed, provide a justification for the question(s) being asked, and clearly state the patient characteristics, intervention, and comparative outcomes (PICO) question. The “Methods” section should contain sufficient detail concerning the search strategy, study inclusion and exclusion criteria, assessment of methodologic quality, data extraction, and analysis used so that others can replicate the study. The analysis should take a quantitative approach whenever possible. The “Results” should be summarized and presented in the text and in figures or tables as appropriate. The “Discussion” section should summarize the primary findings of the review and put the results into the scientific and clinical context of the existing research literature.  The “Clinical Applications” section tells the practitioner how your data can be applied and used.

Word Count: The body of a systematic review or meta-analysis manuscript should have a maximum of 5000 words.

Resources: Authors should consult the following guidelines specific to certain study designs when writing their manuscripts:

Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA),

Meta-analysis of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (MOOSE).

Clinical CASE Report

The JCOS uses a 2 tiered approach to case studies: Clinical Contributions to the Available Sources of Evidence (CASE) Reports. 

Level 1: Validation Clinical CASE Report Level 2: Exploration Clinical CASE Series Report

Abstract: An unstructured abstract consisting of a maximum of 150 words is required. The abstract should follow the PICO format. The following information should be included: 

• 1 to 2 sentences presenting the clinical case, including the primary patient characteristics (age, sex, sport if appropriate) and diagnosis;

• 1 to 2 sentences that describe the intervention—this is the independent variable, which can be epidemiologic, etiologic, diagnostic, prognostic, or therapeutic in nature;

• 1 to 2 sentences that give an overview of the comparative outcome; these are the most important results. For level 1 reports, the focus should be on the outcomes of the current study in comparison with the outcomes of the previously reported study or studies;

• 1 to 2 sentences of interpretation. For level 1 reports, this should include a commentary on the feasibility, practicality, and efficacy of implementing the tested factor in clinical practice. For level 2, this should include a commentary on the uniqueness of the case compared with other health care literature.

Key Words, Word Counts, and Key Points: Immediately after the abstract, these items should be provided:

• 2 to 3 key words; • Abstract word count; • Body of manuscript word count (not counting abstract, references, tables, or figures).

Body of Manuscript: The body of a CASE Report manuscript must contain the following sections: “Introduction,” “Case Presentation” (following the PICO format), “Discussion,” and “Clinical Bottom Line.”

Reporting standards are different for each level of Clinical CASE Reports:  

Level 1: In Validation Clinical CASE Reports, the authors report on using the best available external evidence (eg, systematic reviews, high-impact clinical trials, position statements) to guide clinical decisions in a particular patient scenario. The key feature of this report is that the authors contrast the findings from the Validation Clinical CASE Report with those of the external evidence source in the “Comparative Outcomes” section. The “Clinical Bottom Line” should close the manuscript with an overall statement of the most important clinical points that can be gleaned from the current Clinical CASE study or series. 

Level 2: In Exploration Clinical CASE Series Reports, the authors report on a particular trend across patients that deviates from the standard presentation found within the external evidence. In the “Comparative Outcomes” section, the authors discuss the similarities across the patient presentations but also how the presentations deviated from what has been established in the external evidence. These reports offer new insights into the future investigation of factors related to a particular clinical problem and its resolution. The “Clinical Bottom Line” should close the manuscript with an overall statement of the most important clinical points that can be gleaned from the current Clinical CASE series. 

Word Count: The body of a CASE report manuscript should have a maximum of 2000 words, and no more than 15 references should be cited.

Communications 

Communications articles, such as policy statements such as inter-association consensus statements, are solicited for publication by the JOCS. An author who has a suggestion for such a paper is advised to contact the Editorial Office regarding the suitability of the topic for the JOCS and further instructions.

Letter to the Editor 

Letters to the editor should be less than 1000 words, contain no more than 10 references, and be submitted to the Editorial Office.

Manuscript Revisions 

Manuscripts returned to authors for revisions must be resubmitted within 3 months of the date of the decision letter to be considered for publication. Revised manuscript submissions must include the revised manuscript highlighting the responses to the reviewers and revisions made to the manuscript, a “clean” (ie, changes-incorporated) manuscript, and separate files containing the itemized comments of each reviewer, followed by the response to each comment, indicating the revisions made to the manuscript or providing a justifiable rebuttal.

 

 

Accepted Manuscripts 

Papers accepted for publication undergo copyediting and final approval by the corresponding author before final production. Papers are posted ahead of print on the JOCS’s Web site. Manuscripts are edited by a professional editor to improve the effectiveness of communication between authors and readers and to aid the authors in presenting work that is compatible with the style policies found in the AMA Manual of Style. Page proofs are sent to the corresponding author as PDFs for proofreading, and any changes must be returned within 48 hours. Please keep in mind that alterations are costly.